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What do you think about the plans for the future transit hub?


Do you have any comments about the transit hub plans?

Answered
55
Skipped
11

What would make you want to use Waterloo Street to connect to the transit hub?

Answered
53
Skipped
13

What features are most important to you? Prioritize in order of importance.

Average priorities over 66 responses
  1. Design elements such as murals, street design, attractive seating, interesting stairs could be included. 

    Attractive design
  2. Each option can be made technically safe, but the overpass with stairs/elevator may feel more secure because it is more open and visible to everyone in the area. Jane Jacobs, a famous author on cities, called this openness, and the security it provides, "eyes on the street."

    Safety/security
  3. This could include trees for shade and coverings for the overpass and underpass.

    Protection from rain/snow/sun
  4. The ramp option provides uninterrupted access for strollers and wheelchairs.

    Easy stroller/wheelchair access
  5. Options that maximize the amount of space for landscaping are the underpass and overpass with stairs/elevator.

    As much green landscaping as possible
  6. Absorbing and slowing water during storms helps to prevent flooding.

    Landscaping that manages water during storms
  7. Lighting can be used to make the area more interesting at night. It can contribute to a more secure space.

    Creative lighting
  8. The overpass with staris/elevator and the underpass options would encourage people to use Waterloo Street. Landscaping, seating and public art all contribute to a park-like feeling.

    Park-like feeling
  9. Trees would provide shade, comfort and beauty to the space.

    Trees
  10. Public art is a one-of-a-kind artwork made just for the location where it rests, tells a story and celebrates special places.

    Public art
  11. Special pavement could help to make Waterloo Street feel more pedestrian friendly and could be used to help manage water during storms.

    Special pavement

Do you have any other comments?

Answered
33
Skipped
33
Name not shown ½ to 1 km
June 3, 2016, 11:48 PM
  • Do you have any comments about the transit hub plans?

    The high density option fits well with the site. It's already a dense urban environment with little shadow impact, and has the potential to be a signature mixed-use transit-oriented development. I'd be comfortable with density being even higher if a developer desired, I see no reason to have an upper limit on density on this site.

  • What would make you want to use Waterloo Street to connect to the transit hub?

    Underpass remains the best option, as it avoids a lot of unnecessary up and down for pedestrians. I think vandalism concerns can be minimal if the doors to the transit hub site are located on the far side of the rail corridor, and the tunnel becomes an interior area of the transit hub.

  • What features are most important to you? Prioritize in order of importance.
    1. Design elements such as murals, street design, attractive seating, interesting stairs could be included. 

      Attractive design
    2. Lighting can be used to make the area more interesting at night. It can contribute to a more secure space.

      Creative lighting
    3. Trees would provide shade, comfort and beauty to the space.

      Trees
    4. Each option can be made technically safe, but the overpass with stairs/elevator may feel more secure because it is more open and visible to everyone in the area. Jane Jacobs, a famous author on cities, called this openness, and the security it provides, "eyes on the street."

      Safety/security
  • Do you have any other comments?

    Ensure the train shed has a roof over it. Waiting for a train in the rain just isn't a lot of fun.

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Planning for the Transit Hub

The Region of Waterloo has approved a process to integrate the transit infrastructure on the site with the residential, office and retail spaces. Several years of preparation and consultation have resulted in the completion of:

  • A Heritage Impact Assessment
  • An Urban Design Brief
  • A Noise and Vibration Report

The Region of Waterloo and City of Kitchener consulted with the public in Septemeber 2012 on:

  • Official Plan and Zoning By-law approvals
  • A Preliminary Site Design

And in November 2012 on:

  • The Environmental Assessment

These documents set out the City of Kitchener's expectations and the Region of Waterloo's requirements for the Transit Hub. The site illustrations show how the Transit Hub could look, but the final integrated design will be up the selected developer.

Transit Hub Illustrations

The Region is exploring a range of acceptable densities for the transit hub site. The zoning already provides for a maximum density of approximately 1.2 million square feet of residential, office and retail on four acres of land. Minimum floor areas could range from 500,000 to 750,000 square feet. It is expected that the developer would tailor the form, scale and land use mix of the final development according to economic conditions. The Region will retain control of the deisgn of the public transit infrastructure on the site and the City of Kitchener will have final approval of the site layout. The following illustrations show how a range of densities could be integrated with public transit on the site.

Transit Hub Site Illustration - Higher Density

Higher Density Illustration

This illustration shows and example of how the maximum density allowed on the site could look. The zoning allows up to 1.2 million square feet of residential, office and retail on the four acre site, with a landmark tower that could be between 25 and 30 storeys tall. The number of people living and working on the site would be the highest in this example.


Transit Hub site illustration - medium density

Medium Density Illustration

This illustration shows an example of how a mid-range density with about 750,000 square feet of space could look on the site. The tallest building in this illustration could be between 15 and 20 storeys tall. The number of people living and working on the site would be lower than the previous example.


Transit Hub site illustration - lower density

Lower Density Illustration

A lower density development is also a possibility as shown in this example illustration. Minimum floor areas could range from 500,000 to 600,000 square feet on the four acre site, with buildings under 12 storeys tall. The number of people living and working on the site would be the lowest in this example. In each scenario, high quality public spaces would be included.


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