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Check out some recent Registered Statements from citizens

Angie Charlton inside WHITE ROCK February 19, 2018, 6:03 PM

Using the example schedule above, would your household be able to continue to recycle the maximum amount of plastic, aluminum, paper and cardboard and have curbside pick-up for these materials reduced to every other week to accommodate for yard trimmings collection?
Yes, but I need an additional recycle roll cart

Carol Mead inside BARRANCA MESA February 19, 2018, 12:47 PM

Using the example schedule above, would your household be able to continue to recycle the maximum amount of plastic, aluminum, paper and cardboard and have curbside pick-up for these materials reduced to every other week to accommodate for yard trimmings collection?
Yes

Reid Priedhorsky inside ASPEN - WALNUT February 19, 2018, 12:13 PM

Yes.

Climate change is real and a critical, urgent problem. It requires aggressive investment in all types of carbon-neutral energy, which means both nuclear and renewables. Los Alamos is the type of community that should be leading, not following, and this is a great opportunity to do so, even if results are not guaranteed.

Reid Priedhorsky inside ASPEN - WALNUT February 19, 2018, 12:07 PM

Using the example schedule above, would your household be able to continue to recycle the maximum amount of plastic, aluminum, paper and cardboard and have curbside pick-up for these materials reduced to every other week to accommodate for yard trimmings collection?
No, I don’t have space available to have a larger and/or additional recycle roll cart

David North inside LA SENDA February 19, 2018, 12:05 PM

There are good arguments for the design and for participation. However, Idaho is a long way from here. Undoubtedly transmission trading is part of the deal, etc, but my main concern is once again moving toward a system in another state where we do nothing to further development in New Mexico, regardless the system used. Idaho does not need our support. New Mexico does. Probably there are also DOE issues involved that complicate the question. So I'd put it like this: unless the argument to relocate systems out of state is overwhelmingly compelling, we should be working with a New Mexico system, the more local the better.

Heidi Narum inside WHITE ROCK February 19, 2018, 7:23 AM

Using the example schedule above, would your household be able to continue to recycle the maximum amount of plastic, aluminum, paper and cardboard and have curbside pick-up for these materials reduced to every other week to accommodate for yard trimmings collection?
Yes, but I need an additional recycle roll cart

Name not shown inside NORTH MESA February 18, 2018, 12:28 PM

The cheapest energy available today is solar power. Solar PV with batteries is extremely cost-effective (much more so than coal or nuclear) and is increasingly being used for base load electric supply around the world. There isn't any risk or research that needs to be done. These systems are cost-effective, carbon-free, known quantities and we could begin the process to install one immediately. It would be reasonable to look at land owned by the county and Lab to find the space for the array. As the Lab uses most of the power, an agreement that sites some or all of the array on LANL property ought to be possible.

In addition to a solar and battery power system, there are other things we could do immediately to reduce the county's carbon footprint. For example, installing motion detection street lighting would significantly reduce our energy usage and help to keep our dark skies clear of unnecessary background light. Motion sensing street lights have been used in Europe where they have proven capable of illuminating several streets lights in a row when the motion and direction of a car or pedestrian is detected. Only the lights that are needed are illuminated.

Nuclear power is an expensive dead end as fuel is not available from even the most intensive mining possible in quantities needed to power our future unless breeder reactors are built. Given the very high consequences of a breeder reactor failure, even if the probability of an accident were infinitesimal, we would be ill-advised to build them. It is very difficult to calculate the odds of failure when the probabilities are very low as there are too many unknown and unknowable unknowns. For such dangerous reactors that would run day-in and day-out for decades, we could never design a system that had a sufficiently low probability of failure to make it safe enough to build; the consequences of a failure are too explosive.

One thing we do know is that there will be many cost overruns in bringing a new nuclear reactor system online and the county ratepayers would incur at least part of these costs if we continue to be part of the so-called Carbon Free Power Project.

The nuclear industry also has no way of dealing with its waste. The website for the NuScale Inc. Small Modular Reactor (SMR) Project FAQ blithely states that nuclear waste is a political not a technical problem. I do not believe this is true. If all of the technical problems at Yucca Mountain had been solved, we would have a working high-level nuclear waste repository there. Even if it were true that the only obstacle to solving the nuclear waste problem was political, it is still an unsolved problem. We still have many, many tons of nuclear waste sitting at reactor sites that are extremely dangerous both from a technical (think of Fukushima where they had trouble keeping the cooling pumps to the spent fuel ponds running and lack of cooling would have released an enormous amount of radioactive material into the air) and a terrorist standpoint. Pretending the waste problem is easily solvable and not a serious obstacle to nuclear power is terribly misleading.

In summary we need to look at ways other than the SMR project to make our county energy carbon free.

DEBORAH MCLIN inside WHITE ROCK February 18, 2018, 10:35 AM

Using the example schedule above, would your household be able to continue to recycle the maximum amount of plastic, aluminum, paper and cardboard and have curbside pick-up for these materials reduced to every other week to accommodate for yard trimmings collection?
Yes, but I need a larger recycle roll cart

lisa andreatta inside BARRANCA MESA February 18, 2018, 9:53 AM

Using the example schedule above, would your household be able to continue to recycle the maximum amount of plastic, aluminum, paper and cardboard and have curbside pick-up for these materials reduced to every other week to accommodate for yard trimmings collection?
Other: Write in answer

SUSAN KESTELL inside WHITE ROCK February 17, 2018, 7:40 PM

Using the example schedule above, would your household be able to continue to recycle the maximum amount of plastic, aluminum, paper and cardboard and have curbside pick-up for these materials reduced to every other week to accommodate for yard trimmings collection?
Yes, but I need a larger recycle roll cart